5 Best Hiking Trails in Kansas City, MO

Best Hiking Trails in Kansas City, MO

Below is a list of the top and leading Hiking Trails in Kansas City, MO. To help you find the best Hiking Trails located near you in Kansas City, we put together our own list based on this rating points list.

Kansas City’s Best Hiking Trails:

The top rated Hiking Trails in Kansas City, MO are:

  • Swope Park Mountain Bike Trail – a network of bike-friendly trails amid rocks & hardwood forest in Kansas City’s largest park
  • Rozarks Nature Trail – a system of hiking and biking trails with a length of 4.5 miles in the woods of Rosedale
  • Hidden Valley Park – expansive tract of wildland open space that features multi-use paths & a sports field
  • Riverfront Heritage Trails – a recognized Missouri Not for profit Corporation that was created to improve project efficiency, establish amenities, run programs, and maintain the Riverfront Heritage Trail
  • Kessler Park – elegant public gathering space with four memorials, a colonnade, sculpture & a disc golf course

Swope Park Mountain Bike Trail

Swope Park Mountain Bike TrailSwope Park Mountain Bike Trail is the crown gem of the Kansas City Parks system. Swope Park, Kansas City’s largest park and one of the country’s largest municipal parks, is home to many of the city’s best attractions and attracts over 2 million visitors each year. Hiking routes run through woods and meadows, passing by soccer fields, golf courses, community gardens, fountains, and a treetop adventure park. Starlight Theatre, an outdoor amphitheater that hosts musicals and concerts, and the Kansas City Zoo, which houses over 1,000 animals from across the world, are both located within the park.

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Hiking Trail

LOCATION:

Address: 6599 5601 Oakwood Rd, Kansas City, MO 64132
Phone: (816) 513 7500
Website: kcparks.org/places/swope-park/

REVIEWS:

“Amazing trails in the heart of KC. Great mix of tech and flow. I believe there are 20+ miles of trail now. Check Urban Trail Co website for trail status before riding/hiking and please do not use when trails are closed.” – Grant Woodward

Rozarks Nature Trail

Rozarks Nature TrailRozarks Nature Trail is a 4.5-mile network of hiking and bicycle trails. This route was built by hundreds of volunteers and is now maintained by RDA, with trailheads at Mt. Marty Park, Fisher Park, and Minnie St., near Seminary St. Wear sturdy walking shoes before you venture out on the trails because some of them have a steep incline.

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Hiking Trail

LOCATION:

Address: Park Dr, Kansas City, KS 66103
Phone: (913) 677 5097
Website: rosedale.org/recreational-trails

REVIEWS:

“A hidden gem in KC. Cool trails and great views of downtown.” – Leslie Cimino

Hidden Valley Park

Hidden Valley ParkHidden Valley Park covers around 195 acres of land. The mowed area, which is on the north side of Russell Road, is referred to as the “North Area” in the Master Plan. The “Natural Area,” located south of Russell Road, makes up the remaining two-thirds. The Missouri Conservation Department designated 82 acres on the south side as a Missouri Natural Area in 1978. Hidden Valley Park’s trail skirts the rim before plunging into the valley that gives the park its name. Hidden Valley is a mid-length trail with a remote ambiance and unique, breathtaking views down into the valley.

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Hiking Trail

LOCATION:

Address: 4029 Bellaire Ave, Kansas City, MO 64117
Website: kcparks.org/places/hidden-valley-park/

REVIEWS:

“A gem of a park. There is a parking lot across the street from the trailhead. Two main trails with a cool extra challenge area. The trail is a footpath for people and bikes. Lots of diversity and fascinating topography in loess soil. Lots of switchbacks so you can get a decent hike in the woods in a park that feels much bigger than it is. I can’t wait to go back and experience it in different seasons. Great cold weather hike because the closeness of the trees cuts the wind. Great warm weather hike because lots of shade.” – Hilary Noonan

Riverfront Heritage Trails

Riverfront Heritage TrailsRiverfront Heritage Trails is a registered Missouri non-profit organization dedicated to improving project efficiency, establishing amenities, running activities, and maintaining the Riverfront Heritage Trail. It was also established to ensure Trail Design consistency and to promote the Trail in the community. KCRT is not always in a position of authority, but it is always willing to help with trail construction. All initiatives to create a metropolitan trail system have our full support.

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Hiking Trail

LOCATION:

Address: 500-598 W 4th St, Kansas City, MO 64105
Phone: (816) 896 3772
Website: kcrivertrails.org

REVIEWS:

“Enjoyed the benches along the way and enjoyable views. Simple stroll along Kansas and Missouri state divide along the riverfront.” – M Brown

Kessler Park

Kessler ParkKessler Park provides an elegant public gathering space with four memorials, a colonnade, a sculpture & a disc golf course. The Board of Kansas City, Missouri Park and Recreation Commissioners honored George Edward Kessler, the landscape architect and engineer who was a driving force in the creation of Kansas City’s park and boulevard system, in 1971 by renaming one of the early parks created through Kessler’s master plan as George E. Kessler Park. North Terrace Park was the park’s previous name, and it was a key component of the master plan described in the First Report of Park and Boulevard Commissioners of Kansas City, Missouri, in 1893.

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Hiking Trail

LOCATION:

Address: Chestnut Trafficway, Kansas City, MO 64123
Phone: (816) 777 6430
Website: kcparks.org/places/kessler-park/

REVIEWS:

“It’s a relic from another century that was a huge necessity. It provided water to all the homes in the Kessler Park area and now has become a unique piece of history full of artwork, but I also thought there was a lot of great photo opportunities especially with the pond around at the bottom. There’s a frisbee golf course that surrounds the outside of the reservoir basically taking up most of the open park space.” – William Brislan